All Our Yesterdays by Cristin Terrill

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From Goodreads:

“You have to kill him.” Imprisoned in the heart of a secret military base, Em has nothing except the voice of the boy in the cell next door and the list of instructions she finds taped inside the drain.

Only Em can complete the final instruction. She’s tried everything to prevent the creation of a time machine that will tear the world apart. She holds the proof: a list she has never seen before, written in her own hand. Each failed attempt in the past has led her to the same terrible present—imprisoned and tortured by a sadistic man called the doctor while war rages outside. 

Marina has loved her best friend James since the day he moved next door when they were children. A gorgeous, introverted science prodigy from one of America’s most famous families, James finally seems to be seeing Marina in a new way, too. But on one disastrous night, James’s life crumbles apart, and with it, Marina’s hopes for their future. Now someone is trying to kill him. Marina will protect James, no matter what. Even if it means opening her eyes to a truth so terrible that she may not survive it. At least not as the girl she once was. 

All Our Yesterdays is a wrenching, brilliantly plotted story of fierce love, unthinkable sacrifice, and the infinite implications of our every choice.

My Thoughts

What in the freak just happened?!?!

Sorry, I had to get that out or my head was going to explode.

This story is so intricate and intense and PUNCHING ACTION AT YOU at every turn! Seriously, right up from the beginning I was like, WHOA, you don’t waste any time getting down to the nitty-gritty.

The dual POV between Em and her past self, Marina, admittedly jarred me at first. There’s this whole intro based on Em and the craziness that is her life at that moment in time and then BAM! all of a sudden we’re jarred into Marina’s conversation with her dopey friends from four years earlier. At first I was confused about that massive leap in story line, but I guess time traveling does have the effect of disorientation. Aside from the initial huh? factor, the dual POV was not only an integral part of the plot, but it was also really compelling to be able to see everything happen from past and future perspectives.You get to experience both the younger, more naive versions of the characters along with the hardened and fierce personalities they grow into. In the future. But not really in the future because they go back in time . . . AH! Moving on.

Another pro about this book canned be summed up in just two words: Finn Abbott. *sigh*

Also, the fact that it’s a story based on time travel and there’s a character they call the doctor: PRICELESS.

This is a book that I need to reread to completely understand all this time travel mumbo jumbo. Call me a simpleton, but I did get caught up in the ending and finished feeling confused. How could that have just happened?! Also, it’s the first in a duology, but after the ending I don’t even know what to expect from the second part! Although I suppose anything can happen when you throw in time travel . . .

I do wish we would’ve gotten a better look at what the world in the future was like to make it so horrifying. It was mentioned, but I didn’t feel the same horror that compelled Em and Finn to go back in time to change things. I knew of it, but I didn’t feel it.

Overall, I laughed, I gasped, I cried, I was overwhelmed from all the talk of paradoxes and of time being sentient and the like. This story is brilliantly crafted, giving life to time travel and love and sacrifice. If this isn’t on your TBR yet, I wouldn’t hesitate even for a moment to slap it on there; it is truly a smart, vivid read.

4/5 stars;)

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